Do you recognize this tree?

However much we want to spread our appreciation around, it’s hard not to be partial to the Coast Redwood — it seems to be everyone’s favorite these days. This species appears in multiple Heritage Tree articles, not only for its prevalence in our parks and public spaces but also for its recognized beauty, history and significance.

The final tree recognized this season is a single Coast Redwood at 71 Hazel Lane, nominated by Cindy Rafton.

This tree marks the entrance to the former Ransom-Bridge school for girls that opened in 1913, and where neighbors have found remnants of the school during home renovations on Requa Road and Highland Avenue over the years. Rafton believes that her home is located near the former school’s kitchen. Today, it is hard to imagine that this very stoic and stately tree was part of another–very different–Piedmont garden over 100 years ago.

Sequoia sempervirens, also known as a Coast Redwood or California Redwood, is the sole living species of the genus Sequoia in the cypress family. It is an evergreen, living 1,200–1,800 years or more. This species includes the tallest (and some of the oldest) living trees on earth, reaching up to 379 feet in height and up to 29 in diameter.

Before commercial logging and clearing began by the 1850s, this massive tree thrived on an estimated 2,100,000 acres along much of coastal California from Big Sur north to the southwestern corner of coastal Oregon.

What tree/s would YOU like to nominate to be recognized as one of our Heritage Trees?

The Park Commission is accepting nominations for 2020 Heritage Trees through March 16. To nominate a tree, visit the City’s website, www. ci.piedmont.ca.us and complete the downloadable form. The selected trees will be recognized at this year’s Arbor Day celebration on April 9.

SEE RELATED

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *